Rosemont in the 1910s

  • The January 1, 1910 edition of the Star recounted that in 1909, “[j]ust beyond the confines of the city houses in large numbers have been erected.”
  • The January 27, 1910 edition of the Star reported that Frank H. Treat, president of the Rosemont Development Company, was among the invited guests at the annual banquet of the chamber of commerce.
  • The March 9, 1910 edition of the Gazette featured a display ad from F.L. Slaymaker’s real estate business that for the first time described him as: “The Rosemont Man.”
  • The March 11, 1910 edition of the Gazette reported that the street lamps for Rosemont had arrived, and once installed, “Rosemont will be as well lighted as any city in the country.” The article added that an hourly night watchman’s service had been initiated.
  • The April 1, 1910 edition of the Gazette reported that the Rosemont Co. was arranging to have the streets treated with an oil dust preventative, as well as that only four lots on the north side of Rosemont Avenue remained unsold and that their price would be increased by $100 on April 15.
  • The April 30, 1910 edition of the Star recounted points of interest along the electric trolley line, including “Rosemont, so closely on the borders of the town of Alexandria that the water supply of that place is shared and is piped into the houses of Rosemont.”
  • The June 18, 1910 edition of the Star profiled the house that had been built for E.H. Kemper in Rosemont.
  • The June 18, 1910 edition of the Post reported that after “having a feast in a field between the steam and electric railway tracks, a short distance east of Rosemont station,” Robert Murphy of Alexandria started a fight four friends which resulted in his death. The friends attempted to telephone the police from the Rosemont Station, but upon being informed that it had no phone, they instead took the train to Alexandria, where they turned themselves in. One of the friends was later convicted and sentenced to three years in prison, according to a report in the June 30, 1910 edition of the Post. Articles in the May 21, 1910 and June 19, 1910 editions of the Herald and the June 19, 1910 edition of the Star also reported on the story.
  • The July 12, 1910 edition of the Gazette reported that ground had been broken on a house for Mr. Thos. A. Hulfish and that work was proceeding on houses for Mr. C.E. Dare and Mr. T.A. Groves. The article added that a public telephone had been installed at Rosemont Station, which was where the night watchman makes his headquarters.
  • The September 1, 1910 edition of the Gazette reported that Mr. T.A. Groves had moved into his house and that work was progressing on house for Mr. Thos. A. Hulfish and Mr. C.E. Dare. The article added that Mr. Chas. A. Sale had purchased a lot on Cedar Street, and was having Mr. Milton D. Morrell prepare plans for a house.
  • The September 16, 1910 edition of the Gazette reported that Mr. Milton D. Morrell had completed plans for the house of Mr. Charles A. Sale, as well as that Mr. Henry J. Warther, master mechanic at Potomac Yards, was having Mr. Leon Clark prepare plans for a house at the corner of Cedar Street and King Street.
  • The September 21, 1910 edition of the Gazette reported that Mr. Bertram S. Nelligan, a civil engineer of the District’ engineer’s office, had purchased for $5,500 one of the eight brick houses that had been built on Cedar Street by the Rosemont Company, leaving only one unsold. The article added that Cedar Street was being extended to King Street.
  • The November 5, 1910 edition of the Washington Times profiled Rosemont, stating that the “suburb is striking in its beauty as a whole, and for the artistic class of dwellings which have been erected.” The article added that: “Rosemont was planned after Wayne, a suburb of Philadelphia where the president of the Rosemont Development Company, F.H. Teat, has his home.”
  • The November 14, 1910 edition of the Gazette reported that the Rosemont Company had ordered an entire car load of shrubbery and trees from the Thomas Nursery near Wayne, Pennsylvania, for planting in the next two weeks.
  • The November 15, 1910 edition of the Post reported that Lamar Monroe, a mail carrier, had unsuccessfully sued the Rosemont Development Company for $8,000, alleging that he had been thrown from his horse after it was frightened by the whistle of a steam roller. Articles in the May 20, 1910 edition of the Washington Times and the November 14, 1910 edition of the Star also reported on the story.
  • The November 22, 1910 edition of the Gazette reported that Mr. Milton D. Morrell was designing houses to be built on Cedar Street for Mr. Alexander Suiter and Mr. Frank Slaymaker. The article added that: “In anticipation of the continued rapid development of Rosemont it is expected that these homes will find ready purchasers.”
  • The December 6, 1910 edition of the Gazette reported that the Rosemont Company had a horse snow plow and men clearing the streets and sidewalks, keeping up the usual high “Rosemont standard.” The article added that 12-foot maples and shrubbery had been set out the prior week, “so that there will be blooming plants all through the summer throughout the entire length of Rosemont avenue.”
  • The January 15, 1911 edition of the Washington Times reported that Rosemont had been laid out by Frederic H. Treat – a real estate dealer from Wayne, a suburb of Philadelphia – modeled on Wayne, “with the prosperity and upbuilding of which he has been so closely connected.”
  • The April 15, 1911 edition of the Star recounted developments along the electric trolley line, including in Rosemont, noting that “[n]ot very long ago the country between this city and Alexandria was sparsely settled…. But now the population is almost continuous.”
  • The May 24, 1911 edition of the Washington Herald reported that the City’s joint committee on light and general laws had recommended a suitable contract be drafted with the Rosemont Development Company for the laying of gas mains.
  • The June 28, 1911 edition of the Washington Times reported that further consideration of the gas main ordinance was required, because it included a provision which prohibited the Rosemont Development Company and residents from opposing annexation, under penalty of having their meters removed and the supply of gas shut off.
  • The July 12, 1911 edition of the Washington Herald reported that the City had authorized the Mayor to enter into a contract with the Rosemont Development Company for the laying of gas mains.
  • The August 11, 1911 edition of the Washington Herald reported that aviator Anthony Janus was expected to make a trial flight of a new monoplane from one of the fields adjacent to Rosemont.
  • The October 16, 1911 edition of the Washington Times reported that the City was expected to take action to annex neighboring areas, including Rosemont. “The feeling on the part of the residents of that section is generally receptive, and it is believed that the time is ripe.”
  • The December 13, 1911 edition of the Star reported that ground had been broken in Rosemont for the construction of houses for Alexander Suter and F.L. Slaymaker by the contractor Samuel Devaughan.
  • The February 26, 1912 edition of the Post reported that various parties had filed a lawsuit in the Circuit Court for Alexandria County (today Arlington County) challenging the City of Alexandria’s plan to annex various neighboring territory in Fairfax County and Alexandria County (including Rosemont). The June 3, 1912 edition of the Post reported that the assessed value of the land to be annexed from Alexandria County had an assessed value of almost $1 million, but residents asserted that its actual value was about $5 million.
  • The March 24, 1912 Washington Times reported that a small fire in the cab of a motor car on the Washington-Virginia Railway was quickly extinguished, with minor damage to the car and a half-hour traffic delay.
  • The April 9, 1912 edition of the Washington Times reported that the Rosemont Development Company was constructing a “high service” water system for residences and fire protection, because the neighborhood was above the area that could be served by the Alexandria Water Company. The work, under the supervision of David J. Howell, would include a 25,000 gallon supply tank on a steel tower, at a cost of nearly $5,000.
  • The April 13, 1912 edition of the Washington Star profiled the suburbs developing between Washington and Alexandria, noting that “in some instances, notably at Rosemont, grass plots and beds of flowering and foliage plants lend their welcome to the tired eye of the returning suburbanite or the city visitor.”
  • The May 9, 1912 edition of the Herald reported that a tennis court had been built in Rosemont and the Rosemont Tennis Club organized: Frank L. Slaymaker, President; C.E. Dare, Vice President; George Warfield, Secretary and Treasurer; and Alexander Suter and C.D. Hubbard also on the board of governors.
  • The August 22, 1912 reported the death of James Haislip, who had been employed as the night watchman in Rosemont.
  • The September 12, 1912 edition of the Post reported that the roof of the Rosemont electric railway station had been set afire by lightning, but it was extinguished by residents before assistance arrived from Alexandria. A similar report appeared in the September 12, 1912 edition of the Washington Times.
  • The September 16, 1912 edition of the Washington Times reported that the trial on the City’s efforts to annex Rosemont and other neighboring areas would begin the next day in the Circuit Court for Alexandria County. Records of the case indicate that witnesses at the trial included Rosemont residents Frank L. Slaymaker, Thomas C. Smith, and Thomas A. Hulfish.
  • The October 9, 1912 edition of the Herald reported that a deal was pending for the sale of 24 lots in Rosemont.
  • The October 21, 1912 edition of the Post reported that “Rosemont is the favorite strolling place of Alexandrians,” and that canes for women had become popular.
  • The January 19, 1913 edition of the Washington Times reported that Judge Bennett T. Gordon of the Alexandria County court had ruled against Alexandria’s proposal to annex portions of the county, including Rosemont, which “depend[s] entirely on Alexandria for fire and police protection and also secure[s] [its] gas, water and electricity from the city’s plants.”
  • The March 29, 1913 edition of the Post reported that the inaugural meeting was to be held of the Rosemont Citizens Association at the electric railway station, “to cooperate in keeping Rosemont, one of the suburbs of Alexandria, ‘a little city beautiful,’ and providing for some form of fire protection.” The April 2, 1913 edition of the Post reported that the newly-elected officers were Edward H. Kemper, President; Robert L. Payne, Vice President; Frank L. Slaymaker, Secretary; and E. A. Garlock, Treasurer. Other members of the executive committee were A.J. Pohl, George W. Keys, and T.A. Hulfish. Similar reports appeared in the March 30, 1913 editions of the Herald and the Washington Times. The March 27, 1913 edition of the Star noted the advance agenda of the meeting
  • The April 6, 1913 edition of the Post reported that at a meeting of the Rosemont Citizens Association, the President of the Rosemont Development Company – Dr. A.E. Wills – assured the members that it would cooperate with them in every possible way. The association discussed the purchase of a chemical fire apparatus and the erection of a club house. A similar report appeared in the April 6, 1913 editions of the Herald and the Star, and the April 2, 1913 edition of the Herald noted the advance agenda of the meeting.
  • The May 17, 1913 edition of the Herald reported that Mount Vernon Avenue had been improved from Rosemont through Virginia Highlands.
  • The May 17, 1913 edition of the Washington Times reported that arrangements had been made to purchase a chemical fire engine and erect a building to house the apparatus to provide fire protection, noting that the suburb had been without fire protection since the decision in the annexation case. Alexandria County was reported to have appropriated $100 towards the purchase. Similar reports appeared in the May 18, 1913 editions of the Herald and the Star.
  • The June 9, 1913 edition of the Post reported that another meeting of the association was to be held that evening.
  • The July 24, 1913 edition of the Post reported that the Rosemont Citizens Association had ordered a chemical fire engine and organized a volunteer fire department, with Thomas A. Hulfish as chief and George W. Keys as chairman of the committee on fire prevention. Similar reports appeared in the July 22, 1913 edition of the Star and the July 23, 1913 edition of the Washington Times, and the July 21, 1913 edition of the Washington Times noted the advance agenda of the meeting. The July 23, 1913 of the Star also noted that women of Rosemont were among the members of the fire department.
  • The July 31, 1913 edition of the Herald reported that a severe storm had destroyed the newly built fire engine house at Rosemont. A similar report appeared in the July 31, 1913 edition of the Star.
  • The August 16, 1913 edition of the Herald reported that the new chemical fire engine was now housed in a new engine house, and that a lawn fete was expected to be held for the benefit of the volunteer fire department. Similar reports appeared in the August 16, 1913 editions of the Washington Times and the Star.
  • The August 27, 1913 edition of the Washington Times reported that a tennis tournament would take place in Rosemont.
  • The August 29, 1913 edition of the Star reported that a brick waiting station had been constructed in North Rosemont by the Washington Utilities Company.
  • The September 21, 1913 edition of the Star noted that in addition to the fire engine in Rosemont, there were also two in the town of Potomac (now Del Ray), but none had yet had any but practice runs.
  • The November 5, 1913 edition of the Herald reported that residents of Rosemont had petitioned for city delivery service from the post office. A similar report appeared in the November 4, 1913 edition of the Washington Times.
  • The November 14, 1913 edition of the Post that Rosemont would soon receive two mail deliveries per day, instead of the one delivery provided in rural areas, responding to a petition signed by “[p]ractically every resident of Rosemont.” A similar report appeared in the November 14, 1913 edition of the Herald and the November 16, 1913 edition of the Star. The November 17, 1913 edition of the Post specified that the change would be effective on December 1, 1913, as did the December 1, 1913 edition of the Star. A similar report appeared in the November 30, 1913 edition of the Washington Times, which added that about seventy-five families received mail in Rosemont.
  • The January 4, 1914 edition of the Herald reported that a power boat owned by Edward Garlock of Rosemont had been demolished when a storm dashed it against the Duke Street wharf. A similar reported appeared in the January 4, 1914 edition of the Star.
  • The March 13, 1914 edition of the Herald reported that Councilman R.M. Graham had moved to Rosemont and would not again be a candidate for office.
  • The May 24, 1914 edition of the Post reported that the newly-elected officers of the Rosemont Citizens Association were Edward H. Kemper, President; Thomas A. Hulfish, Vice President; Frank L. Slaymaker, Secretary; and George R. Keys, Treasurer. Other members of the executive committee were A.J. Pohl, C.E. Dare, and Wilmer J. Waller. The association discussed erected a brick building in which to house its chemical fire engine, which was quartered in a portable metal building. The association also reported that the construction of a second tennis court for the use of Rosemont residents had been completed. Similar reports appeared in the May 23, 1914 editions of the Herald, Star, and the Washington Times.
  • The July 4, 1914 edition of the Star profiled Rosemont and reported that although less than five years old more than 50 houses had been built in the suburb, and the article was accompanied by five photos of them. After providing various details of the community, the profile concluded: “A strong community spirit prevails among the residents of the suburb. The conditions of their homes and the grounds surrounding them indicate a universal desire to make the community attractive. The interests of the residents are safeguarded by a citizens’ association. The residents of Rosemont have organized a tennis club and have two courts adjoining the station and waiting room. Plans for the erection of a clubhouse now are being considered.”
  • The August 4, 1914 edition of the Post reported that Rosemont residents were among those protesting the route selected by the United States Director of Public Roads, Logan Waller Page, for a boulevard to Mount Vernon, which would enter Alexandria via North Washington Street instead of via Russell Road. A similar report appeared in the August 3, 1914 edition of the Washington Times and the August 4, 1914 edition of the Herald. The August 6, 1914 edition of the Post reported that Page had said that his office would not consider any change. A similar report appeared in the August 6, 1914 editions of the Herald and the Washington Times.
  • The August 11, 1914 edition of the Herald reported that Congressman C.C. Carlin hosted a meeting at his Washington office with representatives of the Jefferson District Good Roads Association seeking the construction of a two-mile road between Rosemont and Hume Springs. A similar report appeared in the August 12, 1914 edition of the Herald.
  • The August 14, 1914 edition of the Washington Times reported that a meeting was held in the rooms of the Chamber of Commerce for the purpose of protesting the proposed route of the boulevard to Mount Vernon, including representatives of Rosemont. Edward H. Kemper sponsored a motion to employ legal counsel, explaining that he was not opposed to road improvements but desired to see the money expended where the most good could be accomplished.
  • The September 5, 1914 edition of the Herald reported that the Rosemont Tennis Club would host a three-day tournament.
  • The September 9, 1914 edition of the Herald reported that a resolution proposed by Councilman J.T. Harrison that Alexandria take over the gas mains in Rosemont had been referred to the joint committee on finance and light.
  • The October 23, 1914 edition of the Herald reported that Thomas A. Hulfish, chief of the Rosemont Fire Department was among those in attendance at a banquet marking the opening of a new fire house in Alexandria for the Relief Hook and Ladder Company. A similar report appeared in the October 23, 1914 edition of the Washington Times.
  • The November 11, 1914 edition of the Herald reported that the corporation attorney of Alexandria had been instructed to prepare the necessary papers to take over the gas mains in Rosemont.
  • The January 31, 1915 edition of the Herald reported that the City Council had agreed to pay the Rosemont Development Company $5,482.93 for the gas mains in Rosemont.
  • The February 9, 1915 edition of the Washington Times reported that a “jitney” bus would operate between the corner of King and Royal Streets in Alexandria to Cedar Street in Rosemont, for a five-cent fare.
  • On March 11, 1915 (84 S.E. 630), the Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia reversed a decision of the Circuit Court for Alexandria County and authorized the City of Alexandria to annex various neighboring territory in Fairfax County and Alexandria County (including Rosemont). The opinion make various mentions of Rosemont, including that its residents “attend the churches, places of amusement, participate in the social life of the city, and are practically, as closely connected with the city life as are the people residing within the city’s boundaries.” Reports on the decision appeared in the March 12, 1915 edition of the Washington Times and the March 13, 1915 edition of the Star. The April 1, 1915 edition of the Gazette reported that annexation became effective that day.
  • The April 24, 1915 edition of the Post reported that “The Greater Alexandria Citizens Association” had been created to represent the interests of residents of the newly annexed sections of the city, including Rosemont. The association selected as its president Edward H. Kemper, who was already the President of the Rosemont Citizens Association. The directors from Rosemont were C.A. Dare and T.A. Hulfish. A similar report appeared in the April 24, 1915 edition of the Herald.
  • The May 2, 1915 edition of the Washington Times reported that Virginia Highlands had petitioned to have the fire apparatus in Rosemont removed to their community, since Rosemont was now protected by the fire department of Alexandria. The October 25, 1915 edition of the Herald reported that Virginia Highlands had acquired the chemical engine formerly used by Rosemont.
  • The May 16, 1915 edition of the Star reported that Mount Vernon Boulevard (now known as Russell Road) would be extended four miles to Rosemont by Alexandria County (now Arlington County). The July 21, 1915 editions of the Herald and the Washington Times and the July 25, 1915 edition of the Washington Times reported that $20,000 was to be appropriated by the City for this and related projects.
  • The May 26, 1915 edition of the Herald reported that the City Council had declined to create a fifth ward to include the newly annexed territory, including Rosemont, and recommend that the existing four wards be redistricted. Additionally, A.J. Pohl of was elected by the Council to fill a vacancy in the third ward.
  • The May 27, 1915 edition of the Post reported that a monument had been unveiled marking the point from which Major General Edward Braddock had departed Alexandria with a force of British and Virginia soldiers in April 1755. The Alexandria Circle of Colonial Dames had the marker erected at the intersection of Braddock Road and what is now known as Russell Road, incorporating a cannon that had been left behind by Braddock. A similar report appeared in the May 26, 1915 edition of the Star.
  • The July 10, 1915 edition of the Herald reported that Rosemont residents applying for dog licenses had been told by City Auditor K.F. price that he would prefer not to issue such licenses until the tax status of the recently annexed territory had been resolved.
  • The July 20, 1915 edition of the Herald reported that roads had been torn up and cellars flooded by heavy rain.
  • The July 28, 1915 edition of the Herald reported that Frederick H. Treat had been elected President of the Rosemont Development Company.
  • The August 27, 1915 edition of the Post reported that a jitney bus would connect the eastern section of the City to Rosemont and Union Station, charging a 5 cent fare. Similar reports appeared in the August 26, 1915 edition of the Washington Times and the August 27, 1915 edition of the Herald.
  • The October 21, 1915 edition of the Washington Times reported that the police had been directed to arrest the owners of cars parked without lights at night in Rosemont, and test in court whether the city had authority to do so.
  • The November 14, 1915 edition of the Washington Times reported that the grading of Russell Road through Rosemont was nearly completed.
  • The November 27, 1915 edition of the Post reported on the reconstruction of Russell Road as well as a proposal to use that name in Rosemont, which for several years had referred to its segment of the road at Mount Vernon Avenue despite the prior existence of another Mount Vernon Avenue in neighboring Del Ray.
  • The December 3, 1915 edition of the Star reported that Alexandria County (now Arlington County) was considering incorporating itself as a city, to prevent the annexation of additional territory, such as Rosemont, by Alexandria. A similar report appeared in the December 3, 1915 edition of the Herald.
  • The December 12, 1915 edition of the Washington Times reported that the City Council had confirmed that the new road through Rosemont should be named Russell Road – after Frederick P. Russell, an attorney in Alexandria – instead of Mason Avenue, in memory of George Mason. The article noted that the road also was known as Mount Vernon Avenue, despite another road of the same name a half mile to the east.
  • The January 15, 1916 edition of the Herald reported that the city’s new motor fire engine had performed satisfactorily in its first run, responding to a chimney fire in Rosemont.
  • The January 20, 1916 edition of the Post reported that the Board of Police Commissioners had conferred special police powers upon E.C. Beahm, at the request of the Rosemont Citizens Association.
  • The January 26, 1916 edition of the Post reported that the City Council was considering spending $9,000 to provide bituminous paving on Russell Road in Rosemont. A similar report appeared in the January 26, 1916 edition of the Washington Times. The May 19, 1916 edition of the Post reported that the work was in progress, funded by a bond sale.
  • The March 26, 1916 edition of the Post profiled Rosemont, reporting that 53 houses had been built, with four more under construction and five additional houses being planned
  • The March 30, 1916 edition of the Washington Herald reported that the Alexandria Water Company had purchased the water distribution system of the Rosemont Development Company.
  • The May 1, 1916 edition of the Post reported that the Rosemont Citizens Association through its President, Edward H. Kemper, had submitted a report to the City Council advocating measures to control the breeding of mosquitos, including the draining of stagnant pools near Union Station.
  • The August 10, 1916 edition of the Washington Times reported that improvements were being made to King Street adjacent to Rosemont.
  • The September 9, 1916 edition of the Post reported that lightning had damaged a house at the corner of King Street and Rosemont Avenue, owned by the Rosemont Development Company and occupied by Miss Sue L. Ballantine, Miss Mary L. Whitall, Miss Louise Caton, and Miss Bertha Waite. A similar report appeared in the September 9, 1916 edition of the Washington Herald.
  • The September 13, 1916 edition of the Washington Herald reported that the City was considering a proposal to appropriate $1,150 to lay a concrete base for the portion of Russell Road in Rosemont. A similar report appeared in the September 13, 1916 edition of the Star.
  • The November 15, 1916 edition of the Washington Herald reported that the City was considering a proposal to assume responsibility for the fire hydrants in Rosemont.
  • The August 31, 1917 edition of the Washington Times reported that the honor man for the graduating West Point class of 1918 (receiving their diplomas early, due to the demands of World War I) was Herbert Henry Pohl of 23 Rosemont Avenue, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Pohl.
  • The March 26, 1918 edition of the Post reported that trains had been stopped at the Rosemont electric railway station to scrutinize the feet of male passengers, searching for deserters who might be wearing army shoes. A similar report appeared in the March 26, 1918 edition of the Washington Herald.
  • The May 19, 1918 and May 20, 1918 editions of the Herald reported that a Red Cross parade would include a unit of uniformed women from the Rosemont chapter.
  • The June 5, 1918 edition of the Herald reported that the Rosemont branch of the Red Cross had raised $625.41 in contributions.
  • The June 15, 1918 edition of the Herald reported that 162 unsold lots in Rosemont and property to the east had been sold by the Rosemont Development Company to the General Realty Company, and that houses were expected to be constructed to be rented or sold to employees of the Virginia Shipbuilding Corporation. A similar report appeared in the June 16, 1918 edition of the Star.
  • The August 28, 1918 edition of the Herald reported that the General Realty Company had submitted a petition to the City for nine fire hydrants in East Rosemont.
  • The September 1918 edition of the Rivet, a newsletter for employees of the Virginia Shipbuilding Corporation, reported that the company had purchased 553 lots in Rosemont upon which Mr. F. Goodnow was supervising the construction of homes that would be available for sale to employees. The article described Rosemont as “the most slightly tract of land between Washington and Alexandria.”
  • The October 23, 1918 edition of the Herald reported that the City was considering a petition from the General Realty Company that certain streets in the new subdivision of East Rosemont be taken over by the City.7
  • The January 2, 1919 edition of the Herald reported that the Rosemont Development Company was constructing 200 houses for employees of the Virginia Shipbuilding Company. A similar report appeared in the January 1, 1919 edition of the Star.
  • The February 13, 1919 edition of the Herald reported that the Rosemont Branch of the Red Cross had elected its officers for the year.
  • The March 27, 1919 edition of the Herald reported that the General Realty Company had erected or was in the course of constructing 1,000 houses in East Rosemont.
  • The May 13, 1919 edition of the Post reported that Jesse Ralph of 13 Cedar Street had been shot in his home by D. Worth Stanton, also of Rosemont, who alleged that Ralph had “disturbed his domestic happiness.” A similar report appeared in the May 13, 1919 edition of the Herald. Ralph later died, according to a report in the May 15, 1919 edition of the Herald. The August 9, 1919 edition of the Post reported that a jury had found Stanton not guilty. The trial also received extensive coverage in the Herald.
  • The May 14, 1919 edition of the Herald reported that Julian D. Knight had been awarded a $175,000 contract for the construction of 24 houses in West Rosemont by L. Morgan Johnson and George H. Rucker. A similar report in the June 1, 1919 edition of the Herald stated that 40 houses were to be constructed, with sales prices starting at $7,500. The July 27, 1919 edition of the Herald again referred to 24 houses, and stated that building was proceeding rapidly.
  • The November 26, 1919 edition of the Post reported that the City was discussing whether it should assume responsibility for the streets in Rosemont, as well as construct a trunk sewer through Rosemont “to take the place of Hooff’s Run, which is now practically an open sewer.”
  • The December 13, 1919 edition of the Herald reported that L.M. Johnston had begun construction on 30 houses in Rosemont, eight of which already had been sold.

 


Rosemont Station, c. 1915 (the child may be Richard Kemper, son of early Rosemont resident E.H. Kemper):

Rosemont Station, c. 1915

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