Rosemont in the 1920s

  • The February 25, 1920 edition of the Herald reported that the City was studying whether it should assume responsibility for certain streets in Rosemont.
  • The April 25, 1920 edition of the Washington Times profiled the 30 houses being built by L.M. Johnston in North Rosemont, “modern in every way with furnace heat, electric lights and gas.” The May 29, 1920 and July 17, 1920 editions of the Washington Times further reported on the construction.
  • The April 28, 1920 edition of the Post reported that a delegation representing the Rosemont Citizens Association, with E.H. Kemper and Julian T. Burke as the spokesmen, had requested that the city enact legislation that would require the removal of an advertising sign at the intersection of King Street and Russell Road, which was both unsightly and as an obstruction had been the cause of an automobile collision.
  • The May 5, 1920 edition of the Star reported that the Virginia Shipbuilding Company was under investigation for having used $400,000 paid to it for ship construction to instead build houses in Rosemont.
  • The June 6, 1920 edition of the Herald profiled Rosemont, describing it as “attractive properties, while providing the freedom of open country yet giving all the comforts of city life.” The article specifically described houses being built by Graham & Ogden in North Rosemont.
  • The September 5, 1920 edition of the Herald reported that 12-year old Augusta Rode of Rosemont had received a fourth prize (50 cents) for the colored drawing she had submitted of her summer travels to the newspaper’s “Uncle Wiggily.”
  • The September 12, 1920 edition of the Herald reported that Julian D. Knight had been awarded a contract by Mr. Black of Washington to construct a store in East Rosemont.
  • The October 11, 1920 edition of the Herald reported that the City Council was considering a proposal to assume responsibility for certain streets in Rosemont, including in the Johnston subdivision. A similar report appeared in the October 12, 1920 edition of the Star and the October 13, 1920 edition of the Post. The proposal apparently was accepted, because the November 10, 1920 edition of the Washington Times reported that the City would install five lights in the Johnston subdivision.
  • The October 21, 1920 edition of the Post reported that Mayor James M. Duncan had informed the Board of Police Commissioners that he had received complaints about automobiles exceeding the speed limits in Rosemont, and that the police had been instructed to arrest all violators.
  • The November 14, 1920 edition of the Herald reported on a Congressional investigation of corruption at the United States Shipping Board, including an allegation that building materials intended for a shipyard had been diverted to Rosemont, in which the Virginia Shipbuilding Corporation had an interest.
  • The January 8, 1921 edition of the Star reported that forty-five houses in Rosemont had been sold to investors who planned to sell them directly to buyers, priced between $4,000 and $6,000.
  • The March 17, 1921 edition of the Herald reported that H. Hammond, President of the Rosemont Citizens Association, had submitted a petition to the police commissioners to open a substation at Rosemont Station. The commissioners endorsed the proposition and submitted it to City Council. The June 29, 1921 edition of the Herald reported that the resolution had been referred to the committee on finance and streets.
  • The October 16, 1921 edition of the Star reported that Mrs. William N. Nes of 18 Walnut Street had been chosen as a delegate from Virginia for the national alumnae meeting of Goucher College students in Baltimore.
  • The October 29, 1921 edition of the Herald reported that winners of the baby show held at the Young People’s Building included Catherine Lee Richardson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Richardson of Rosemont (tied for best girl between 6 months and 1 year) and Lucille Plumb, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. D.H. Plumb of Rosemont (best girl between 3-4 years).
  • The January 3, 1922 edition of the Herald reported that the cost of a round-trip ticket between Alexandria and Washington was being reduced by 8 cents the Washington-Virginia Railway Company. A round-trip ticket from Rosemont and North Rosemont would cost 40 cents; from Braddock, 30 cents.
  • The February 10, 1922 edition of the Post reported that a committee of Rosemont residents had complained to the school board about the sanitary conditions at the West End School, which was then the elementary school attended by Rosemont children.
  • The April 26, 1922 edition of the Herald reported that the Chamber of Commerce had appointed a committee to urge the City to construct and underground passage built between East Rosemont and Oronoco Street, including James Bayne, F.S. Jackson, and Captain George H. Evans.
  • The May 24, 1922 edition of the Herald reported that the City had referred a resolution to spend $500 on street repairs in Rosemont had been referred to the committee on streets and finance. The June 7, 1922 edition of the Herald reported that $1000 had been appropriated.
  • The June 17, 1922 edition of the Herald reported that Captain Herman H. Pohl, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Pohl of Rosemont, had been awarded highest honors in civil engineering by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • The July 7, 1922 edition of the Herald reported that contractor and builder Hugh Herfurth, Jr. had purchased a tract of unimproved property in Rosemont from Stephen Balch and planned to build houses. The July 18, 1922 edition of the Herald stated that the land had been purchased by J.H. Taylor with Herfurth as the contractor, and that thirty-five houses would be built in Mount Vernon Park.
  • The July 28, 1922 edition of the Herald reported that the Rosemont Park Company had purchased a tract of land north of Rosemont from John H. Lloyd, Nora Lee Lloyd, M.G. Kennedy, and Mina C. Kennedy. A similar report appeared in the July 28, 1922 edition of the Washington Times.
  • The August 5, 1922 edition of the Washington Times reported that lots in the Rosemont Park subdivision were being sold by the National Realty Co.
  • The August 12, 1922 edition of the Herald reported that a deed has been recorded for the Mount Vernon Park subdivision, including seventy-seven lots on 13 acres. Six houses as well as sewers and sidewalks were reported to be under construction by Hugo Herfurth, Jr.
  • The September 3, 1922 edition of the Washington Times reported that the worst rainstorm in forty-four years had caused flooding throughout the area, including in Rosemont.
  • The October 8, 1922 edition of the Post reported that F. Clinton Knight, the new postmaster of Alexandria, had announced additional collections from the mailbox on Mount Vernon Avenue (as Russell Road in Rosemont was then known) between Cedar Street and Rosemont Avenue, as well as that an additional mailbox would be placed at North View Terrace and Walnut Street. A similar report appeared in the October 8, 1922 editions of the Herald and the Washington Times.
  • The December 30, 1922 edition of the Washington Times reported that the Post office at Potomac (as Del Ray was then known) would be discontinued and four mail carriers from Alexandria would provide two deliveries per day to the area, including Rosemont.
  • The April 4, 1923 edition of the Post includes the first display ad for homes being built in “Rosemont Park” in east Rosemont.
  • The April 11, 1923 edition of the Post reported that the City was discussing with railroad officials the possibility of a passage under the tracks at Oronoco Street, to create a direct route to East Rosemont.
  • The July 31, 1923 edition of the Post reported that the Alexandria Playgrounds Association was constructing a playground for the children of Rosemont on a two-acre parcel near Union Station loaned to it by the Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railway.
  • The August 17, 1923 edition of the Post reported that the dormant Rosemont Development Company continued to hold title to a number of streets in Rosemont, and the City Council was considering a proposal to vest title in the streets to the City.
  • The October 5, 1923 edition of the Star reported that the City Council was continuing to consider assuming responsibility for the streets in Rosemont, including the Johnson and Rucker’s subdivision.
  • The October 19, 1923 edition of the Post reported that the Rosemont Park Company had petitioned the city council to construct 1,500 feet of roads at an estimated cost of $3,000, for which the company would pay $500 initially and $500 per year until paid for.
  • The October 26, 1923 edition of the Post reported that the streets of Rosemont Park would bear names connected with George Washington, including of the physicians who attended his last illness – Dr. Dick and Dr. Craik – and his pallbearers – Ramsey, Little, Gilpin, Simms, and Marsteller. (Some of these street names were implemented but changed in the 1930s – for example, Craik Street later became East Masonic View Avenue.)
  • The March 22, 1924 edition of the Star reported that Dorothy Raff, 15, of Rosemont was arrested at the request of her parents in an effort to stop her from marrying Joshua S. Harrington, 19, but she was taken into custody only after they had been married, and both left police headquarters with the bride’s father.
  • The April 12, 1924 edition of the Star reported that Henry Wardman of Washington had purchased ten houses in Rosemont at auction for a total of $36,000.
  • The May 2, 1924 edition of the Star reported that the General Realty Corporation had requested that the City improve Maple Street between Washington Avenue (now Commonwealth Avenue) and North View Terrace with sewers, gas mains, sidewalks, gutters, and roadway.
  • The July 25, 1924 edition of the Star reported that the City had allocated $2,650 to pave and add sidewalks to West Walnut Street between North View Terrace and King Street. A similar report appeared in the July 17, 1924 edition of the Star.
  • The January 21, 1925 edition of the Post reported that the gas supply to Rosemont had been cut off for several hours when the gas main at Hooff’s Run broke and allowed water to enter.
  • The January 24, 1925 edition of the Post reported that the Northwest Citizens Association had been organized, encompassing the Rosemont, North Rosemont, East Rosemont, George Washington Park, Glendale, and Braddock subdivisions, and that its first action had been to support an application by the Alexandria, Barcroft & Washington bus line. Joseph E. Chauncey chaired the meeting and R.C. Holloman was made chair of the bylaws committee.
  • The January 28, 1925 edition of the Post reported that numerous Rosemont residents had complained about low gas pressure, and that the City was considering the installation of a new main, at the cost of $40,000. In the October 2, 1925 edition of the Post, the problem was identified as the “dead end” for the gas main at Russell Road and Alexandria Avenue, but a new proposal to correct the problem, at a cost of $10,600, was stated to be before the council. The October 31, 1925 edition of the Post reported that the work of laying a new gas main had begun, with a now-estimated cost of $15,000. The November 5, 1925 edition of the Post reported that the work was expected to be completed by December 15, 1925.
  • The January 28, 1925 edition of the Post reported on a meeting of the Northwest Citizens Association, which was being formed to represent the residents of Rosemont and other neighborhoods. The February 3, 1925 edition of the Post reported that the selected officers were Harry F. Kennedy, President; J. Fred Birrell, Vice President; J.D. Perry, Second Vice President; Elmer G. Finley, Secretary; E.A. Sweely, Treasurer; and Mrs. Everett A. Hellmuth, Financial Secretary.
  • The February 17, 1925 edition of the Post reported that 250 feet of bituminous roadway were to be installed on West Walnut Street between North View Terrace and King Street.
  • The April 10, 1925 edition of the Star reported that the Rosemont Park Company had sued the International Bank, alleging that the bank had failed to honor a financing agreement and seeking $150,000 in damages.
  • The May 25, 1925 edition of the Star included an ad from the Sanitary Grocery Co. which announced that a new store would be opening in Rosemont. A similar ad appeared in the May 28, 1925 edition of the Star.
  • The June 8, 1925 edition of the Post reported that Rosemont Park, Inc. had sold 50 lots in the prior week, mostly to prospective home builders, and that Craik Street had been extended half a mile from Russell Road to the railroad tracks, including a bridge over Hooff’s Run.
  • The July 10, 1925 edition of the Post reported that $2,300 was owed to the City by the Rosemont Park Development Co. for the costs of street construction, but that there was little probability of collecting the amount due.
  • The July 15, 1925 edition of the Post reported that a manhole cover had been blown 100 feet in the air due to a leaking gas main on Walnut Street.
  • The July 28, 1925 edition of the Post reported that one of two mounted police officers to be added to the force would be assigned to Rosemont.
  • The July 31, 1925 edition of the Post reported that Harry F. Kennedy, President of the Northwest Citizens Association, appeared before the City Council to call attention to the insanitary condition of Hooff’s Run.
  • The August 5, 1925 edition of the Post reported that a meeting of the Northwest Citizens Association had been postponed due to the absence from the city of its President, Harry F. Kennedy.
  • The September 18, 1925 edition of the Post reported that the City Council had prohibited the installation of curbside filling stations on certain streets, including Russell Road.
  • The September 26, 1925 edition of the Post reported that a 2-week-old baby boy was found by Roger B. Adams of Rosemont in his front yard, and turned over to the Alexandria Hospital by the police, who had no clues about the identity of the persons who left the baby in the yard. A similar report appeared in the September 24, 1925 edition of the Star. The October 1, 1925 edition of the star reported that the baby had been adopted by Mr. and Mrs. S.B. Williams of Del Ray.
  • The October 2, 1925 edition of the Post reported that the City Manager had presented a report on Hooff’s Run, which recommending sewering the run because it was a “menace to health,” at a cost of $3,500.
  • The October 8, 1925 edition of the Post reported that at a meeting of the Northwest Citizens Association, the executive committee was directed to prepare a resolution calling upon the City Manager to enforce the speed regulations for street cars. The article also noted the recent report on the condition of Hooff’s Run.
  • The November 20, 1925 edition of the Post reported that the City Council had discussed street and sidewalk improvements in Rosemont, with the understanding that as a matter of law the City was not yet legally responsible for them.
  • The January 2, 1926 edition of the Star reported that the City Council would soon take up a proposal to construct a sewer along Hooff’s Run, into which sewage from Rosemont currently drained.
  • The May 9, 1926 edition of the Post reported that the estate of the late Charles M. Adams – including the “Eastern View” house on King Street, in Rosemont, had been sold at auction to Ephraim M. Adams for $37,500. An additional strip of land on King Street adjoining Rosemont was sold to Howard W. Smith (then a judge, and a future member of Congress) for $3,525.
  • The October 18, 1926 edition of the Star reported that Rosemont residents were without water after a car on King Street hit a fire plug, and the resulting leak drained the Alexandria Water Co. tower of its full 25,000 gallons.
  • The February 18, 1927 edition of the Post reported that the City Council had authorized the issuance of $16,000 in bonds to fund permanent improvements to the gas mains extended to Rosemont.
  • The March 4, 1927 edition of the Post reported that Harry Kennedy, President of the Northwest Citizens Association, had appeared before the City Council to urge the construction of the proposed Hooff’s Run sewer, “in order that the conditions in Rosemont may be relieved before warm weather.”
  • The March 18, 1927 edition of the Post reported that property owners in Rucker Place petitioned the City to condemn for an alley a strip of land owned by Urban S. Lambert so as to afford entrances to their garages. The Council extended an invitation to Lambert to appear before the Council, with a view towards reaching an agreement.
  • The June 28, 1927 edition of the Post reported that Harry F. Kennedy, President of the Northwest Citizens Association, was a candidate for the Virginia House of Delegates, after previously being an unsuccessful candidate for City Council. A similar report appeared in the June 28, 1927 edition of the Star.
  • The October 1, 1927 edition of the Star reported that the City Council was considering the floatation of $60,000 in bonds for the laying of the proposed Hooff’s Run sewer.
  • The November 26, 1927 edition of the Post reported that the City Council had adopted a resolution to change the name of a segment of North View Terrace to Elm Street.
  • The January 2, 1928 edition of the Post reported that the Northwest Citizen Association would meet to discuss “the location of business in the heretofore restricted area of Rosemont.”
  • The February 3, 1928 edition of the Star reported that the City council had appropriated $1,916 for gas and sewer main construction on Dick Street (now known as East Oak Street).
  • The March 3, 1928 edition of the Post reported that the Rev. Ryland T. Dodge of the Temple Baptist Church was considering a lawsuit against the City, because an ordinance prohibiting construction within 20 feet of a property line would effectively prohibit the church from erecting a new building on a lot it had acquired at King Street and Russell Road.
  • The March 12, 1928 edition of the Post reported that Hooff’s Run was being dredged in advance of sewer construction that was expected to begin in April. The cost of the work was estimated to be $60,000. The article noted that the work had been delayed for several years due to unsuccessful efforts to have Arlington County construct a sewer for the portion of the run in its jurisdiction.
  • Articles in the April 18, 1928 and June 12, 1928 editions of the Post indicated that the Sanitary Grocery Co. was doing business at the North Rosemont Station.
  • The May 4, 1928 edition of the Post reported that Rosemont residents opposed the proposal by Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey to erect a filling station at Russell Road and King Street. The individuals who addressed City Council included Harry F. Kennedy of the Northwest Citizens Association. The matter was deferred. A similar report appeared in the May 4, 1928 edition of the Star. The May 18, 1928 edition of the Post reported that the proposal had been denied, along with another proposal to erect a similar filling station at Russell Road and Linden Street.
  • The May 4, 1928 edition of the Star reported that the City was considering a $2,500 appropriation for the construction of gas mains in Rosemont.
  • The May 18, 1928 edition of the Post reported that the City Council had appropriated $2,500 for the installation of additional gas mains in Rosemont.
  • The July 5, 1928 edition of the Star reported that Courtney L. Nalls, 3, of Rosemont, had been burned on his hand by a torpedo but was recovering.
  • The July 6, 1928 edition of the Star reported that the City council had deferred consideration of a request from Rosemont residents that East Maple Street and East Linden Street be extended to the west across the electric railway tracks, and also received a request from the Chamber of Commerce and the Retail Merchants Club that an underpass be constructed under the R. F. & P. Railroad tracks to afford Rosemont residents a more direct route to the city’s main business section. A similar report on the underpass appeared in the July 6, 1928 edition of the Post.
  • The August 13, 1928 edition of the Star reported that a storm had caused $2,500 in damage to gravel streets being constructed in Rosemont Park and Temple Park.
  • The October 26, 1928 edition of the Star reported that Rosemont residents had submitted a petition for greater police protection.
  • The December 17, 1928 edition of the Post reported that work had resumed on the Hooff’s Run sewer after being suspended for the winter, and that it now extended north to Walnut Street. The article added that the original Hooff’s Run now takes care of storm water only.
  • The March 18, 1929 and March 20, 1929 editions of the Post reported that a conference was held between city officials and the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad Co. to discuss a proposal to construct an underpass beneath the railroad tracks at Oronoco Street, thereby giving Rosemont residents an eastern route into the city.
  • The May 3, 1929 edition of the Star reported that the City had proposed $4,000 in improvements to Rucker Place, Johnson Place, and North View Terrace.
  • The May 17, 1929 edition of the Star reported that $3,800 had been appropriated by the City to cover two-thirds of the costs of paving Rucker Place, North View Terrace, and Johnson Place; the remaining costs would be paid by residents.
  • The June 26, 1929 edition of the Star reported that the prior day’s storm damaged many dirt and gravel streets, especially in Rosemont, where there were large gullies.
  • The July 19, 1929 edition of the Post reported that a total of $18,600 had been appropriated by the City Council for sewer construction in Rosemont, including on Russell Road from Chapman Street to Maple Street; on Masonic View Avenue, from Russell Road to Junior Street; and from Hooff’s Run to Junior Street via Chapman Street, Russell Road, and Summers Drive. A similar report appeared in the July 19, 1929 edition of the Star.
  • The August 2, 1929 edition of the Star reported that the City had appropriated $13,000 to install a sewer from Hooff’s Run to Junior Street and $3,000 to install a sewer on Russell Road from Chapman Street to Maple Street, but held in abeyance a proposed appropriation of $1,800 to install a sewer on masonic View Avenue from Russell Road to Junior Street.
  • The August 16, 1929 edition of the Post reported that the City Council was considering an allocation of $1,800 for sewer construction along Masonic Avenue, from Russell Road to Junior Street, as well as a request by residents of Dick Street that the street’s name be changed to Oak Street, to match the name on the opposite side of Washington Avenue (now Commonwealth Avenue).
  • The September 13, 1929 edition of the Post reported that the City Council created a new voting precinct, to be known as the Rosemont Precinct, due to congestion at the prior election.
  • The September 20, 1929 edition of the Star reported that the electric railway station would be the voting location for the newly created Rosemont precinct.
  • The December 4, 1929 edition of the Post reported that 9-year old Freddie Abner, who had been living at St. John’s Orphanage in Washington, had decided “that he could no longer be separated from his mother” and walked three hours to his mother’s house at 114 Junior Street. The article added that his mother, Julia Abner, had decided that he should not return to the orphanage and had enrolled him at Maury School.

 


What is now the 100 block of East Walnut Street in 1920 (photo reversed):

East Walnut Street - 100 Block, 1920

 

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